We poke a lot of fun at the big mass market brewers in America finding their products to be more advertising hype over actually tasty beverages. While many in the craft beer world would cheer the downfall of a brewing behemoth if a company is to fail"> We poke a lot of fun at the big mass market brewers in America finding their products to be more advertising hype over actually tasty beverages. While many in the craft beer world would cheer the downfall of a brewing behemoth if a company is to fail">

MillerCoors Alleges 10 Million Embezzlement

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We poke a lot of fun at the big mass market brewers in America finding their products to be more advertising hype over actually tasty beverages. While many in the craft beer world would cheer the downfall of a brewing behemoth if a company is to fail I want it to be by better competition not foul play.

The Milwaukee Journal Sentinel is reporting that MillerCoors is suing numerous ex-employees for embezzling around ten million dollars over the course of thirteen years.

The lawsuit claims that two former executives collaborated with a dozen other people and companies in several other status to defraud the company of its money. The suit names David Colletti and Paul Edwards as the two ex-MillerCoors executives who apparently spearheaded the illicit activities.

Colletti used an internal budget to help his co-conspirator to fraudulently charge MillerCoors for goods and services that were never delivered. The profits from the scheme were then shared with co-conspirator. A sum of money that added up to around ten million dollars.

The suit alleges that Colletti and his wife, Pamela, created a shell company to accept the embezzled funds and that Colletti created his own front companies to further charge MillerCoors with fake bills.

This sort of nefarious behavior is awful and if true I hope those involved are punished within the furthest extent of the law.

Craft breweries are not immune to immoral business practices but it becomes much harder to hide these types of schemes when most employees are acutely aware of each and every order that the company receives. Larger companies like Sierra Nevada or Dogfish Head might be in a position to be abused but microbreweries are far, far less inclined to be victims of such schemes.

Apparently bigger is not always better.