This is the 23rd episode of the Blind Tiger Podcast, recorded on February 24th, 2014.  In this episode Mike, Jesse, and I gathered together in our studio to celebrate the fourth annual Febrewary home-brew crawl.  This is an annual tradition by our friends and colleagues where we"> This is the 23rd episode of the Blind Tiger Podcast, recorded on February 24th, 2014.  In this episode Mike, Jesse, and I gathered together in our studio to celebrate the fourth annual Febrewary home-brew crawl.  This is an annual tradition by our friends and colleagues where we">

1781923<em>10101861807644493</em>310617528_nThis is the 23rd episode of the Blind Tiger Podcast, recorded on February 24th, 2014.  In this episode Mike, Jesse, and I gathered together in our studio to celebrate the fourth annual Febrewary home-brew crawl.  This is an annual tradition by our friends and colleagues where we come together in ever-increasing number to sample the home-brewed beers that many of our friends create in their free time.  Mike and I also indulging in the hobby and enter our own beers to be judged along those from homebrewers in Philadelphia, Baltimore, and just down the street.

We dive into a bunch of interesting news items like the release of new beers coming to market, a brew tour accented with an explosion and subsequent lawsuit, a brewers rant about the unfair business practices in selling beer, and some sexy new Dogfish Head labels drawn by a famous artist.

But the meat and potatoes is really all about Febrewary.  We discuss our highlights of the crawl; the beers like we liked, the beers we loved, the venues, the snacks, and the trends in our friends home brewing.  Everything and anything related to Febrewary.

This episode we start out with the following question to get our panel chatting.  The question is:* If you could host a brew crawl in any city in the world, where would it be and why?*

Show Notes:

Beer News:

  • SlyFox Brewing Company Releasing new Russian Imperial Stout
  • Victory Releases Mad King Weisse in bottles
  • Franconia Is Sued by Tour Guests during Tank Explosion
  • White Birch Brewing has FB posts decrying unfair beer marketing practices
  • Magic Hat is releasing its first new year-round beer in a decade
  • Dogfish Head is revamping their labels on their seasonal beers Festina Peche, Punkin Ale, Piercing Pils, and Aprihop
  • Oregon Senator Ron Wyden named co-chair of Senate Bipartiasan Small Brewers Caucus

Febrewary 2014:

The Beers:

  • EBS: Extra Bitter Session
  • BBD: Basic Belgian Double
  • B&C Ginger Ale
  • Moffatt’s Sweet Potato Porter
  • Chuck’s Fighter Double IPA
  • Sassy Molassy Rye Pale Ale
  • Caribbean Style IPA
  • Wildflower Honey Ale
  • The Smoking Gun
  • Peirce’s Pragmatic Porter

Beer vs Beer:

Mike’s Beer: Caribbean Style IPA

Rob’s Choice: Sassy Molassy Rye Pale Ale

Point Counterpoint:

We like to talk about legislation a lot on the podcast, not only Pennsylvania’s own ridiculous laws regarding beer, but the whole countries big-top shenanigans. It seems just about every state handles the regulation and sale of alcohol in a slightly different manner, and sometimes the rules border on absurd. There are plenty of old, often ignored laws on the books. Hell, I am sure in PA you still can’t drink a beer while riding a horse whilst singing “Mary Had a Little Lamb”, but if somewhere someone were to do that, I doubt he would be arrested for that specific crime. Enter Maine, who normally seems to be a beer friendly state, with several notable craft beer breweries. Several weeks ago, the Maine Liquor and Lottery Commission, who enforces the alcohol laws in the state, dusted off an old law put on the books right after prohibition that seemed to deem the publication of alcohol by Volume, or ABV, as illegal. The Maine LLC decided to suddenly enforce the ABV ban law, citing a worry that such information would lead to “underage drinking” and “over serving”. Luckily, while there was a move in the state senate to enact emergency legislation to remove the law, the head of the Maine Liquor and Lottery Commission came to his senses and determined that the law did not criminalize simply posting the percentage number, but only was illegal if a bar were to advertise the number as a tool to sell the beer. I still would like to debate the necessity of enforcing this law, and why it would or would not be a good idea in Today’s Point/Counterpoint.

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